Click on small photos

Cadet will not Lie, Cheat, Steal, or Tolerate Those Who Do


USMA at West Point


We have changed the wording of our Alma Mater to reflect the fact that our Women Graduates have also given their lives serving this Nation.


----- Class of 2012 Motto ------

- "For More Than Ourselves" -Thank you Class of 2012 - for the Honor of Marching with you The Class of 62 - Can Do


Remember - The Soldiers you will lead Always Come First


Motto -- Duty Honor Country


The Cadets of West Point


They played perhaps Army's Greatest Game. They were the Team that Gave The Most


Washington's Letter recommending the establishment of the Academy and the History of West Point


The Oaths We Take


West Points Medal of Honor Winners


Jefferson Hall - the Academy's new Library.


Douglas MacArthur

Vinegar Joe Stilwell cleaning his Thompson -The Walkout -Burma 1942

George Patton


The Monuments of West Point


Kosciuszko Monument - Guarding the Hudson ensuring there is no passage of British Man of War


Forts of the Hudson

So we'll sing our reminiscences of Benny Havens, Oh!


Academic Excellence


---- Colonel Thayer


West Point


Trophy Point


L'Ecole Polytechnique Monument, or The French Monument by Cadets


Superintendent's Quarters viewed from Thayer Road

Superintendant was not Happy Black '57



Home of the Dean


Quarters 104

Cadet Chapel


Michie Stadium


Arvin Gym


Kimsey Athletic Center


Holleder Center


Washington Monument


United States Military Academy Band


Cadet Barracks


Rugby Complex


Great Chain


Plain looking toward Washington Hall


Battle Monument


Washington Hall with Cadet Chapel on rocks above.


Hudson River


Captured Trophies


Battle Monument


West Point Cemetery


Plain


Cost to this Nation of Differing Views


Trophy Point -- Our Flag


Corps of Cadets Formed in Companies early 1960s


Corps of Cadets Formed in Companies early 1960s


Sending the Army Team off to Beat Navy


Army Mule


Color Guard


Band Box Review Early 1950's in Central Area


Battalion Mass Early 50's


Flirtation Walk



Arvin Gym


Duty Honor Country


Cadet will not Lie, Cheat, Steal, or Tolerate Those Who Do


Motto -- Duty Honor Country

Remember - The Soldiers you will lead Always Come First

Academic Excellence

--They played perhaps Army's Greatest Game. They were the Team that Gave The Most

Colonel Thayer

West Point mid 60's

Trophy Point

L'Ecole Polytechnique Monument, or The French Monument by Cadets

Superintendent's Quarters viewed from Thayer Road

Cadet Chapel

Michie Stadium

Arvin Gym

Kimsey Athletic Center

Holleder Center

Washington Monument

United States Military Academy Band

Barracks

Rugby Complex

Great Chain

Plain looking toward Washington Hall

Battle Monument

Washington Hall with Cadet Chapel on rocks above.

Hudson River

Captured Trophies

Battle Monument

West Point Cemetery

Plain

Cost to this Nation of Differing Views

Trophy Point -- Our Flag

Corps of Cadets Formed in Companies early 1960s

Corps of Cadets Formed in Companies early 1960s

Sending the Army Team off to Beat Navy

Army Mule

Color Guard

Band Box Review Early 1950's in Central Area

Battalion Mass Early 50's

Flirtation Walk

Cadet will not Lie, Cheat, Steal, or Tolerate Those Who Do

Motto -- Duty Honor Country

Remember - The Soldiers you will lead Always Come First

Academic Excellence

They played perhaps Army's Greatest Game. They were the Team that Gave The Most

Colonel Thayer

West Point mid 60's

Trophy Point

L'Ecole Polytechnique Monument, or The French Monument by Cadets

Superintendent's Quarters viewed from Thayer Road

Cadet Chapel

Michie Stadium

Arvin Gym

Kimsey Athletic Center

Holleder Center

Washington Monument

United States Military Academy Band

Barracks

Rugby Complex

Great Chain

Plain looking toward Washington Hall

Battle Monument

Washington Hall with Cadet Chapel on rocks above.

Hudson River

Captured Trophies

Battle Monument

West Point Cemetery

Plain

- Cost to this Nation of Differing Views

Trophy Point -- Our Flag

Corps of Cadets Formed in Companies early 1960s

Corps of Cadets Formed in Companies early 1960s

Sending the Army Team off to Beat Navy

- Army Mule

Color Guard

Band Box Review Early 1950's in Central Area

Battalion Mass Early 50's

Flirtation Walk

Click on Photos Below

Please note it takes a couple of hours to update all pages as material is added to this section. You may have to return to the home page to see all of the current links

Cadet will not Lie, Cheat, Steal, or Tolerate Those Who Do

We have changed the wording of our Alma Mater to reflect the fact that our Women Graduates have also given their lives serving this Nation.

----- Class of 2012 Motto ----- "For More Than Ourselves" Thank you Class of 2012 for the Honor of Marching with you The Class of 62

---------- Class of 2008 --------- ----- Class Crest & Motto ----- "No Mission Too Great"

---- Their Commencement ---- "Here am I; Send me."

Thank you Class of 2008 and Please Thank the Men & Women --- the Soldiers you will lead --- The Class of 62.

Motto -- Duty Honor Country

Remember - The Soldiers you will lead Always Come First

Jefferson Hall - the Academy's new Library.

Academic Excellence

--They played perhaps Army's Greatest Game. They were the Team that Gave The Most

---- Colonel Thayer

West Point mid 60's

Trophy Point

L'Ecole Polytechnique Monument, or The French Monument by Cadets

Superintendent's Quarters viewed from Thayer Road

Cadet Chapel

Michie Stadium

Arvin Gym

Kimsey Athletic Center

Holleder Center

Washington Monument

United States Military Academy Band

Barracks

Rugby Complex

Great Chain

Plain looking toward Washington Hall

Battle Monument

Washington Hall with Cadet Chapel on rocks above.

Hudson River

Captured Trophies

Battle Monument

West Point Cemetery

Plain

- Cost to this Nation of Differing Views

Trophy Point -- Our Flag

Corps of Cadets Formed in Companies early 1960s

Corps of Cadets Formed in Companies early 1960s

Sending the Army Team off to Beat Navy

- Army Mule

Color Guard

Band Box Review Early 1950's in Central Area

Battalion Mass Early 50's

Flirtation Walk

Arvin Gym

Duty Honor Country

Cadet will not Lie, Cheat, Steal, or Tolerate Those Who Do

Motto -- Duty Honor Country

Remember - The Soldiers you will lead Always Come First

Academic Excellence

--They played perhaps Army's Greatest Game. They were the Team that Gave The Most

---- Colonel Thayer

West Point mid 60's

Trophy Point

L'Ecole Polytechnique Monument, or The French Monument by Cadets

Superintendent's Quarters viewed from Thayer Road

Cadet Chapel

Michie Stadium

Arvin Gym

Kimsey Athletic Center

Holleder Center

Washington Monument

United States Military Academy Band

Barracks

Rugby Complex

Great Chain

Plain looking toward Washington Hall

Battle Monument

Washington Hall with Cadet Chapel on rocks above.

Hudson River

Captured Trophies

Battle Monument

West Point Cemetery

Plain

- Cost to this Nation of Differing Views

Trophy Point -- Our Flag

Corps of Cadets Formed in Companies early 1960s

Corps of Cadets Formed in Companies early 1960s

Sending the Army Team off to Beat Navy

- Army Mule

Color Guard

Band Box Review Early 1950's in Central Area

Battalion Mass Early 50's

Flirtation Walk

Cadet will not Lie, Cheat, Steal, or Tolerate Those Who Do

Motto -- Duty Honor Country

Remember - The Soldiers you will lead Always Come First

Academic Excellence

--They played perhaps Army's Greatest Game. They were the Team that Gave The Most

---- Colonel Thayer

West Point mid 60's

Trophy Point

L'Ecole Polytechnique Monument, or The French Monument by Cadets

Superintendent's Quarters viewed from Thayer Road

Cadet Chapel

Michie Stadium

Arvin Gym

Kimsey Athletic Center

Holleder Center

Washington Monument

The material below this point is a site a work area.


Page 2








































































The '54 Crest

General MacArthur stated it would take

"at least 10 years"

to return Army Football to Respectability


28th Infantry Regiment
Black Lion Award is intended to go to the person on his team "who best exemplifies the character of Don Holleder: leadership, courage, devotion to duty, self-sacrifice, and - above all -

an unselfish concern for the team ahead of himself."


General George Patton

"The Army moves as a team, eats as a team, and fights as a team."


The '55 Crest











They played perhaps Army's Greatest Game.

They were the Team that Gave The Most


Don Hollender Remember - The Soldiers you will lead Always Come First


Vann and Holleder


9 Army A's


The '56 Crest


The '57 Crest










Can Do


Gen Van Fleet addressing the Corps prior to the Navy Game


Constructed under supervision of Jay Gould "54 and the Ord Dept from a German Rocket Gun captured at Kasserine Pass. First used in the Duke Game.


COL "Red" Reeder granted the Cheerleaders Corps Squad status to obtain financial support for their spirit-inducing initiatives.


Bob Mischak - - It should be pointed out that Bob was an All American selection, but is not recognized by the Academy as such because of the organization which selected him.









Ubel scores 3 Times against Navy - Vann's facking results in Peter getting tackled - #10 on the ground behind Ubel

Vann to Sisson

Army's B Squad

Vann to Mischak.

Uebel Intercepts

Cody to Don Holleder








Lasley

Frank Hicks

Burd

Bill Purdue

Cody

Meador Mgr

Ron Melnick







Ralph Chesnauskas

Pat Uebel

Tommy Bell

Sisson headed for another score

Peter Vann stuffs the ball in Jerry's gut

Leroy Lunn & Jerry Lodge

Uebel after taking the handoff from Hagan







Attaya - Army's Fullback

Sisson - one of 3 Great Ends

Bob Mischak

Unknown


Unknown

Vann moving out of the pocket

Peter Vann 10, Billy Chance 38, Herdman 68







Ken Kramer

Joe Lapchick

Kirk Cockrell


Lodge going down tosses to Paul Schweikert for score.




Unknown

Bob Farris
Played the 2d half of the Navy Game blind in one eye.







Pat Uebel

Tommy Bell

Peter Vann

Freddie Attaya

Mike Zeigler

Jerry Lodge wearing #67, playing fullback.

Wynn




Lowell Sisson


Norm Stephen

Jack Krause

Dick Ziegler

Jerry Lodge

Leroy Lunn






Norm Stephen

Jerry Lodge

Corps of Cadets for Navy Game

Can Do

General MacArthur stated it would take

"at least 10 years"

to return Army Football to Respectability

General George Patton

"The Army moves as a team, eats as a team, and fights as a team."

Don Hollender Remember - The Soldiers you will lead Always Come First








The '54 Crest

The '55 Crest

28th Infantry Regiment
Black Lion Award is intended to go to the person on his team "who best exemplifies the character of Don Holleder: leadership, courage, devotion to duty, self-sacrifice, and - above all -

an unselfish concern for the team ahead of himself."


They played perhaps Army's Greatest Game.

They were the Team that Gave The Most


The '56 Crest


The '57 Crest





Bill McWilliams Support of the 1953 Nomination

January 29, 2009

Mr. Bob Beretta

Senior Associate Athletic Director for Athletic Communication

U.S. Military Academy

639 Howard Road

West Point, NY 10996

Dear Mr. Baretta;

I am honored to have the privilege of supporting, and in the strongest possible terms urging the selection of the 1953 Army football team for the Academy's Sports Hall of Fame.

Enclosed please find the book, A Return to Glory, and two articles, one on Vince Lombardi, the other on the 1953 Army-Duke football game, both published some years ago in Assembly magazine. Together, these three items chronicle the history of Army football's astonishing turnaround following the devastating 1951 cheating incident, a turnaround crowned by the 1953 team's glowing achievements. The succeeding paragraphs will highlight a few of the team's additional, unforgettable accomplishments and effects, some comments resulting from their play and at the same time, through the enclosed writings offer those considering the nomination a far deeper understanding of its remarkable history. With respect to the book, I will identify the most pertinent chapters and pages to ease learning about the players and their season, a season never to be forgotten by the Corps of Cadets of that era - and a season that inspired the Bicentennial book's title.

Before proceeding, it is important to put the subject in perspective with Coach Earl Blaik's words about the 1953 Army football team. In his 1974 autobiography, The Red Blaik Story, he wrote, "When I come to describe the team of 1953, what they meant to me and, far more important, what they meant to West Point, I cannot praise them enough." Of them, Grantland Rice wrote with eloquent simplicity, "They came up the hard way and there probably has never been a squad with a finer spirit." True, we did look for better things than in 1951 and "52". We did not harbor, however, the faintest dream of even localized empire. Any prognostication that we would win the Lambert Trophy, emblematic of the Eastern Championship, and be rated No. 14 nationally would have been tabbed fantastic. With Coach Blaik's words as background, the team's history echoes his witness.

They were one of the smallest Army football teams in years, at season's end thirty-eight men, a team of heroes with no stars and with a different hero each Saturday, all playing for honor and love of the game, undeniable facts laid out in chapters 17-19 (pages 787-916) in A Return to Glory. They were led by quiet, solid leaders from the class of 1954; augmented by a small number of players from the smallest Academy class in years, 1955, and a bevy of talented yearlings in the class of 1956 who set the gridiron on fire that fall. All, together, became inspired. Though the phrase wasn't originated by Coach Earl Blaik, it was the incomparable football teacher, the thoroughly emotionally-controlled Blaik who, with tears in his eyes, handed the Army-Duke game ball to Bob Mischak, Army's left end who made the incredible game-saving tackle. Blaik's words to Bob were simple but powerful, and echo down through the years, "Don't ever give up."

The cheating incident had never-publicized, lingering effects on Army football players in the three following seasons, effects witnessed and painfully felt by the young, inexperienced B and C teams - the men who accomplished the "football miracle" of 1953. As Blaik wrote years later in baring his bitterness and frustration over the cheating incident, "For two years these boys had seen the roughest action. They had lived with the coaching lash, dirt, blood, and defeat." Adding to the effects the players faced was the revelation that the much-admired Army varsity had been deeply involved in what became a national scandal. In a number of cases the players left to pick up the pieces became subjects of totally unwarranted suspicions and stinging criticisms simply because they were Army football players. Army football, indeed, service academy football came under sharp attack in Congress as well as in the media. It seemed to some players that men they had looked up to as champions and team leaders had disgraced not only themselves, the Academy, the Army and Air Force, they had embarrassed and disgraced the game of football. The season of 1953 changed all that -- the team and the Corps of Cadets washed the effects away with stunning, inspirational teamwork and marvelous achievements. Yet, there were more hurdles to cross before they could accomplish their football miracle.

Following the 1952 season, changes in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) rules greatly restricted substitution and for several years virtually ended the offensive-defensive unit two-platoon system. The result was to lengthen playing time for varsity players, decrease the number of varsity letters awarded, increase injury potential, and cause a return to what in years past had been called "iron man football".

To compete under the more complicated substitution rules, Coach Blaik chose to return to the type of two-platoon system he inaugurated at Army during the World War II years, two or three units that went both ways, on offense and defense. While the rule changes impacted all collegiate teams, no team Army was to face in 1953 had suffered the total loss of its varsity lettermen and team leaders two years earlier. The losses had forced virtually complete rebuilding from the ground up. Other colleges and universities would have been able to accelerate efforts to make up such losses with much larger student bodies and massive numbers of alumni on the lookout for talent, aggressive well-funded recruiting, junior college transfers, and the growing lure of expanding professional football immediately after graduation. Not so at Army.

The NCAA rule changes had other impacts not normally visible to cadets and Army sports fans -- but were quite clear to team members vying for varsity status and the coveted Major A. The remaining 1953 team members, who, at the end of the 1952 season believed they had almost secured starting offensive or defensive platoon positions, suddenly found themselves being retested and moved from one position to another to determine who could play both offense and defense and had the conditioning, strength and stamina to play both ways. Their extraordinary individual responses were inspirational, highlighting individual willingness to sacrifice for the team. Again, from Coach Blaik's 1974 book.

"A normal amount of injuries as the season advanced cost us solid fullback and punter "Fred Attaya", hard-nosed right halfback "Mike Zeigler", spirited end "Ski" "Godwin Ordway", and a few others. By the time we got down to the Penn and Navy games, the starting eleven and about four substitutes carried the full load" At quarterback, "Peter Vann" shared the job to some extent with "Jerry Hagan" early in the season, but improved gradually to indispensable level. Vann, Pat Uebel, and "Tommy Bell" at halfbacks and "Gerry Lodge" at fullback played 60 minutes against Penn and almost all the way in the Navy game."

It's important to note, that Peter Vann was a sterling offensive team leader his last two years at Army, became a classic drop-back passer and deft ball-handling and faking wizard who repeatedly confused defensive linemen, and was far more than Blaik's description of him on defense as "dependable in a crisis". Playing at defensive right halfback on the last play of the season's crucial, turnaround game, he too made a game-saving play, batting away a pass thrown from Duke's quarterback to their alternate quarterback -- in the Army end zone - then went on to be ninth in Heisman Trophy voting and a second team All-American quarterback in 1954. Right halfback Tommy Bell, scored one of the two touchdowns against Duke, became a first team All-American in 1954 and that same year one of the few four-year lettermen in Army football history. Yearling left halfback Pat Uebel, who scored one of the two touchdowns in the stunning upset of No. 7-ranked Duke and all three of Army's touchdowns in the win over Navy -- one of a small number of Army players to score three touchdowns against Navy, and to that time the only player to score all three touchdowns in a win over Navy - was another hero in the 1953 Army backfield. Of Army's two lead halfbacks Coach Blaik would write, "In '53 and '54 both Uebel and Bell were among the top echelon of all-time West Point halfbacks." (See pages 202-206 of A Return to Glory, for added information on Thomas J. Bell and Robert M. Mischak.)

Rounding out the backfield after the loss to injury in the Tulane game of the swift, agile, hard-driving fullback, and punter, "Freddie Attaya", was guard-converted-to-fullback "Gerry Lodge", who stepped into Freddie's shoes and performed magnificently at both fullback on offense and linebacker on defense. It was this backfield, plus three great Army ends, and this team that brought Vince Lombardi to the attention of the New York Giants at the end of the 1953 season, setting Vince on course to become a legendary professional coach. (See pages 208-216 for added information on Lowell Sisson, "Gerald Lodge", "Leroy Lunn", "Freddie Attaya", and Peter Vann.)

Blaik said of the three ends on the 1953 team, "Our end play was handled by Bob Mischak, Lowell Sisson, and a yearling of unusual potential named Don Holleder. Sisson was another who kept improving and hit the top in the Navy game. After Attaya's injury, Sisson did the punting. Mischak developed into a fine pass receiver and on defense he delivered the play that was the pivot, in a real sense, of the entire season. Holleder was a naturally talented pass receiver with outstanding speed, hands, and competitive fire. By 1954 he became just about the most dangerous offensive end in college ranks. Don later became an Army legend in his own right. A first team All-American end in 1954, he voluntarily gave up the chance to become a two-time All-American, by acquiescing to Coach Blaik's request that he switch to quarterback for the 1955 season, a position he had never played in either high school or college. On 17 October 1967, his courage and heroism in Vietnam while attempting to rescue wounded soldiers in his unit cost him his life. His life and service became the inspiration for the now-well-known Black Lion Award to football players at every level of football played in the nation, from youth leagues to intercollegiate Division IA.

Army linemen on the thinly-manned 1953 team included three guards, captain "Leroy Lunn", his classmate "Dick Ziegler", and yearling "Ralph Chesnauskas", whose talents included extra-point conversions. Ralph calmly kicked the two extra points against Duke to win the game, and became a first team All-American in 1954. Blaik, writing of "Leroy Lunn", said, "I think it epitomized the character of this team and Lunn's inspirational leadership that he was able to handle a difficult situation in a manner that increased his stature. It was not an easy thing to walk out there every Saturday for the toss of the coin and then to have to return to the bench and not be in for the kick-off. Roy never let this bother his playing when he did get in. He improved so much that he clearly earned the right to start with his team against Navy. Then he went out and played the best game of his career."

Center "Norman Stephen" was a steady, rock-solid team leader on offense, who on the first play from scrimmage in the second half of the second home game of the season, against Dartmouth, -- lit a small but growing fire in the team and Corps of Cadets -- when he broke from the huddle and ran, almost sprinting to the ball, prompting the team to follow his lead. The roar of approval and support from the Corps each time Norm broke and ran to the ball, from that point forward through the rest of the season, continued to unify a determined Corps of Cadets with their team. He was a standout linebacker who was the on-field captain who called defensive signals. Starting at tackle were two yearlings, "Ron Melnik" and "Howard Glock", with first classman "Joe Lapchick", Jr. doing most of the reserve playing.

Coach Blaik considered the heart of his defense to be yearling Bob Farris, a top man academically who in 1955 became the Corps' First Captain, played tackle on offense and was a line backer on defense in 1953. "The linebacking of Farris against Navy was as fine as I have ever seen in that game," he wrote. "Unfortunately, the abandon with which he played cost him a detached retina that ended his football. To have played him would have risked an aggravation that might have impaired his sight. Nevertheless, Bob captained our 54 team and helped out with coaching."

None of the foregoing tells of the incredible will-to-win spirit and support of the 1953 team by the entire Corps of Cadets, all of it specifically intended to unify the team and Corps of Cadets in ways never before seen or heard at West Point. It's marvelous success was marked with the most unusual Lambert Trophy presentation in the award's history. (Detailed in A Return to Glory, pages 912-916). First offered in 1936, and sponsored by New York City's brothers, Victor A. and Henry L. Lambert, the trophy was symbolic of Eastern football supremacy, and had been won by Army in 1944, '45, '46, '48 and '49. For the first time, on a Sunday evening, 20 December 1953, in Washington Hall, the Lambert Trophy was presented outside of New York City to a football team and its student body. (Photograph, page 914)

Respectfully, for your consideration,

Bill McWilliams, USMA 1955

NHF Books, Inc.

2229 Fiero Drive

Las Vegas, NV 89134-6042

702-363-6968; E-mail: brmcw@cox.net

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